Participants

2018 San Diego

Between Orientalism and Orientation: Rethinking Arousal through East Asian Performance

Jasmine Yu-Hsing Chen

Jasmine Yu-Hsing Chen is Assistant Professor in the Department of Languages, Philosophy, and Communication Studies at Utah State University (USU). She receives her Ph.D. from the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses on 20th and 21st century drama and theatrical performance in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China. Her fields of interest include intercultural performance, visual cultures, intermedia modern adaptations of traditional theatre, as well as Sinophone literature and performing arts. From 2015 to 2016, she served the president of the North American Taiwan Studies Association-Wisconsin Chapter. Her article appears on Theatre Dance and Performance Training, the highly regarded journal on performance studies. Her book Fantasy World of Taiwanese Opera: The Progress of Performing Arts in "O-pei-la" and commentaries on theater and film have been published in Taiwan.

Paper title: Dancing Silent Screams: Legacy (1978) and the Arousal of Shared Loss in Martial-Law Taiwan


Maoqing Chen

Maoqing Chen, Visiting Research Scholar of University of Oregon and Professor of East China Normal University, is currently working on the project "The Dissemination and Reception of Tradiotnal Chinese Theatre in the United States: In history and at Present." He was a Fulbright research scholar at University of California at Irvine as a Fulbright research scholar in 2013-14.

Paper title: The Intercultural Embodiment of Arousals in the Beijing Opera "Miss Julie"


Fan-Ting Cheng

Fan-Ting Cheng holds a PhD in Theater and Performance Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is currently an Assistant Professor in Graduate Institute of Taiwan Literature at National Taiwan University. Her newest essay "Towards an Aesthetic of Awkwardness: The Postcolonial and Postfeminist Politics of Fashion Blogs in Taiwan" was published in 2017 on ROUTER: A Journal of Cultural Studies. Her academic interests include contemporary theater, queer politics, and island discourse.

Paper title: The Queer-Asian Reorientation in the Theatrical Aesthetics of Near East Ensemble's Dress In Code


Maria De Simone

Maria De Simone is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Theatre and Drama at Northwestern University. She holds a BA in English and Spanish and an MA in American Literature from Ca' Foscari University in Venice, Italy. At Northwestern, she is affiliated with the Gender and Sexuality Cluster and is the recipient of a Mellon Interdisciplinary Cluster Fellowship. Her dissertation project retraces the off-stage and on-stage lives and personas of immigrant vaudeville performers from Europe and China between 1884 and 1924. She is interested in immigrant artists' deployments of racial impersonation as a stage device and as a tool to grapple with questions of identity, assimilation, and foreignness in the US context.

Paper title: "Re-orienting" Orientalist Fantasies: Lee Tung Foo's and Jue Quon Tai's Racial Impersonations in Early-twentieth-century American Vaudeville


Ellen Gerdes

Ellen Gerdes is a Teaching Fellow and PhD Candidate in Culture and Performance at UCLA. Her dissertation focuses on intersections of the political structure "One Country, Two Systems" and choreography in Hong Kong (post-1984). After earning her Master's degree in dance education from Temple University, she taught as an adjunct at Bucknell, Drexel, Rowan, and Temple universities. Her writing has been published in Asian Theatre Journal, Cultural Studies/Critical Methodologies, Dance Chronicle, Journal of Dance Education, Journal of Emerging Dance Scholarship, Lateral, and the anthology, New Directions in Asian American Dance. In 2007, the Association for Asian Performance awarded her the Emerging Scholars award. In Philadelphia, she danced as a member of the site-specific Leah Stein Dance Company and sang as a member of the Chestnut Street Chamber Ensemble and the Mendelssohn Club symphonic choir. She continues to perform in Los Angeles, most recently with Robert Een and Gwyneth Shanks.

Paper title: Duetting in Hong Kong: Contact and the Politics of Return


Adrianna Geothel

Adrianna Goethel is a PhD student at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. She received her B.A. in Theater from Buffalo State College and M.A. in Theatre and Performance Studies from the University at Buffalo, SUNY. Originally from Virginia, she moved to China at a young age and has lived and studied both in the US and China for most of her life. Her research interests include intercultural performance, Chinese performance, and dance.

Paper title: Dancing for Survival in Shanghai Dance Theatre's Crested Ibises


Reginald Jackson

Reginald Jackson teaches premodern Japanese literature and performance at the University of Michigan. His research interests include medieval handscrolls, noh, and contemporary Japanese choreography. Currently he is revising a book-length study of dancer/choreographer Yasuko Yokoshi's work. His writing appears in Movement Research, Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, and Women and Performance.

Paper title: Numb to the Touch: Cold War Orientalism and the Quarantined Queerness of Premodern Japan


Anthea Kraut

Anthea Kraut is Professor in the Department of Dance at UC Riverside. Her research addresses the interconnections between American performance and cultural history and the raced and gendered dancing body. Her first book, Choreographing the Folk: The Dance Stagings of Zora Neale Hurston, was published by the University of Minnesota Press in 2008, and received a Special Citation from the Society of Dance History Scholars' de la Torre Bueno Prize® for distinguished book of dance scholarship. Her second book, Choreographing Copyright: Race, Gender, and Intellectual Property Rights in American Dance, was published in 2015 by Oxford University Press and won the Association for Theatre in Higher Education's 2016 Outstanding Book Award and the 2016 Biennial Sally Banes Publication Award from the American Society for Theatre Research. Her articles have been published in the edited volumes The Oxford Handbook of Critical Improvisation Studies, The Oxford Handbook of Dance and Reeanctment, The Routledge Dance Studies Reader, and Worlding Dance, and in Theatre Journal, Dance Research Journal, Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory, The Scholar & Feminist Online, and Theatre Studies. Her teaching interests include U.S. dance history, critical race theory, and methods and theories of dance studies.

Paper title: Inter-corporeal Arousals: Orienting Nancy Kwan's Racially Ambivalent Dancing Body 


So-Rim Lee

So-Rim Lee is CKR-AKS Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Korean Research at Columbia University. Her research interests are in contemporary popular culture’s complex embodiments of neoliberalism through performance studies and visual culture, with a focus on modern South Korea. So–Rim also researches on beauty as a mode of neoliberal governmentality, K-pop’s transnationalism, everyday performance in the discourse of self-care, and the intersections between theater and visual culture. So–Rim holds a B.A. in Film Studies from Columbia University, an M.A. in English Literature from Seoul National University, an M.A. in Text and Performance from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, and a Ph.D. in Theater and Performance Studies from Stanford University. In her doctoral dissertation, (Re)Made in Korea: Cosmetic Surgery and the Performance of Self, So–Riminvestigates South Korea’s cosmetic surgery industry and the politics of self-management in the twenty-first century. 

Paper title: Performing Desire through Cosmetic Surgery: Ji Yeo's Art of the Spectacular Melancholy


Weiyu Li

Weiyu Li is a first year PhD student of School of Drama at University of Washington. She got her MA degree from Theatre History, Theory and Literature at Indiana University, and received her B.A. in drama literature from Central Academy of Drama in Beijing. Before coming to the United States, she worked as a lecturer in China, teaching high school students theatre history, theory and playwriting. Her research interests include Chinese modern theatre, Japanese modern theatre, and Chinese American theatre.

Paper title: Japan's Post-Colonial Ghost: Kazuo Ohno's Butoh Performance


Siyuan Li

Siyuan Liu is an Associate Professor of Theatre at the University of British Columbia, Canada. He is Editor of Asian Theatre Journal and former President of the Association for Asian Performance. His published books include Routledge Handbook of Asian Theatre (2016), Performing Hybridity in Colonial-Modern China (Palgrave Macmillan 2013), Modern Asian Theatre and Performance 1900-2000 (co-author, Methuen 2014), and The Methuen Drama Anthology of Modern Asian Plays (co-editor, 2014). He has also published over thirty articles and book chapters on Chinese theatre in the modern era.

Paper title: Censoring Arousal in Traditional Chinese Theatre in the 1950s


Carol Martin

Carol Martin is a Professor of Drama at New York University. Her recent books, Theatre of the Real and Dramaturgy of the Real on the World Stage examine the ways a wide range of international theatre and performance participates in the construction of the real and theorizes how we come to know, experience, and understand the important events of our personal, social and political lives. She is a guest editor of three special issues of TDR "Performing the City," "Reclaiming the Real," and "Documentary Theatre."

Paper title: A Futuristic Portal of Light: Toshiki Okada's Time's Journey Through a Room


Tara Rodman

(Co-Convener)

Tara Rodman is an assistant professor in the Department of Drama at UC Irvine. Her current book manuscript examines the Japanese modern dancer/choreographer Itō Michio. It argues that Itō forged an artistic and social identity out of the very categories of racial and national difference used to exclude Japanese from Euro-American society, and to define Japaneseness within Japan. Drawing together theatre, dance, and performance studies, modernist studies, and transnational Asian/Asian-American studies, this project demonstrates how modern artists refashioned alterity into a basis for creative freedom and freedom of movement. Her articles have appeared in Theatre Journal (on the Kawakami troupe) and Theatre Research International (on The Mikado in post-war Japan). She has forthcoming contributions in the volume Dancing East Asia and the Routledge Companion to Butoh Performance. Reviews and encyclopedia articles have appeared in Theatre JournalTheatre Research International, and the Routledge Encyclopedia of Modernism. She hold an Interdisciplinary PhD in Theatre and Drama from Northwestern University.

Paper title: Learning to be Oriental: Ito Michio, Modern Dance, and the Pan Asian Glance


Shannon Steen

Shannon Steen is Associate Professor of Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies at UC Berkeley. She writes and teaches about race and performance, primarily in the intersection of the African American and Asian American worlds. She is the author most recently of Racial Geometries: The Black Atlantic, Asian Pacific, and American Theatre (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010; part of the Studies in International Performance Series), and is co-editor of AfroAsian Encounters: Culture, History, Politics (New York University Press, 2006). She has published in a variety of journals, and is currently at work on her new book project The Creativity Complex. This essay is the most recent in a series of pieces on US-China theatrical imaginings. Before joining the faculty at Berkeley, she taught for the M.F.A. acting program at American Conservatory Theater in San Francisco, and in the English Department at Northwestern University.

Paper title: Asian America's China


Chee-Hann Wu

Chee-Hann Wu is a doctoral student in Drama and Theatre, University of California, Irvine. She holds an MA in Drama from University of Alberta, Canada, and a BA in Foreign Language and Literature from National Taiwan University. Her research interests include postcolonial performance, dance and physical theatre, and Taiwan and postwar Japan avant-garde performance. She is currently working on the research of remapping East Asian historiography, along with the studies of body and space, through the lens of performance. She is also drawn to the potentiality of puppetry and object theatre in contemporary theatrical performance and interdisciplinary collaborations. She has been working as a producer, director and dramaturg for various productions.

Paper title: Rewriting the Topography and Historiography of Taiwan through Dance: Cloud Gate Dance Theatre's Formosa


Yi-Ping (Claire) Wu

Yi-Ping Wu is a PhD Candidate in Department of Theatre of The Ohio State University. She received her MA degree from National Taiwan University. After finishing the study of master degree, she was awarded Fulbright Scholarship and Ohio State University Fellowship to continue her study for her doctoral degree in the United States. Her research interests focus on ancient Greek drama and its modern interpretation, Asian theatre and Performance Studies, and Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Paper title: Why I Perform on the Street: A Discussion on The Political Body of Korean Comfort Women


Soo Ryon Yoon

(Co-convener)

Soo Ryon Yoon teaches and writes about contemporary performance, dance history, and racial politics in South Korea in the Department of Cultural Studies at Lingnan University, Hong Kong. She is currently working on her first monograph, Choreographing Affinities: Koreanness, Blackness, and Performing Race in South Korea, which explores choreographic articulations — both staged and quotidian — of raced bodies of Koreanness and blackness in the context of global Afro-Asian relations. Her writings are published or forthcoming in Journal of Contemporary Research in Dance (当代舞蹈艺术研究), ASAP/J, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, positions: asia critique, and an edited volume, Corporeal Politics: Dancing East Asia. She received PhD in performance studies from Northwestern University. Before coming to Lingnan, Soo Ryon taught at Yale University as a postdoctoral associate and visiting lecturer in the Council on East Asian Studies and the East Asian Languages and Literatures department.

Paper title: Motion Censoring: Dance, Censorship, and the Making of the Korean Body


Ji Hyon Kayla Yuh

(Co-convener)

Ji Hyon (Kayla) Yuh hold a PhD in Theatre and Performance Studies Program from CUNY Graduate Center. Her current research looks at the global musical theatre within the contexts of South Korean and East Asian political economy, and examines the history and implications of performances of race on musical theatre stage in South Korea and East Asia, using case studies such as Korean productions of Broadway musicals such as Dreamgirls and Hairspray as well as original Korean musicals that feature racial other as central figures in the narrative. She is a contributing author in the Routledge Handbook of Asian Theatre (edited by Siyuan Liu), Palgrave Handbook of Musical Theatre Producers (edited by Laura MacDonald and William A. Everett), Dancing East Asia (forthcoming, edited by Emily Wilcox and Katherine Mezur), and The Routledge Companion to the American Stage Musical: 1970 and Beyond (forthcoming, edited by Elizabeth Wollman and Jessica Sternfeld).

Paper title: Arousing Minjok: Race, Nation, and Representation in Korean Musical Theatre


Yi-Jen Yu

Yi-Jen Yu is a first-year PhD student who was born and raised in Taiwan. She received her BA in Chinese Literature and her MA in Drama and Theatre from National Taiwan University. Her former research focuses on crosscultural Butoh practices in Taiwan and postwar Japanese theater and performance. Her interests also include Sinophone theatre and performing arts, postcolonialism, and art activism. She is currently working on exploring the mediatized representations of the colonized or exiled bodies in East Asian history.

Paper title: Voguing Indigeneity: Aljenljeng Tjatjaljuvy's Embodied Interpretation of Ballroom Culture and Street Dance

 

PAST PARTICIPANTS

2016 Minneapolis

Race and Performance in Transnational East Asia

Megan Ammirati

Megan Ammirati (meammirati@ucdavis.edu) is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Davis, holding a designated emphasis in Feminist Theory and Research. Her research concerns female impersonators and professional actresses in twentieth-century China and the shift in acting styles and performance strategies, more broadly. From 2014 to 2015, she served as the editorial assistant for book reviews for ASTR’s journal Theatre Survey.

Paper title “Racial and Gender Impersonation in East Asian Adaptations of Uncle Tom’s Cabin”


Keisha Brown

Keisha Brown (kbrow110@tnstate.edu) is a 2007 graduate from the University of Notre Dame with a bachelor’s degree in American Studies and Chinese. Dr. Brown completed her doctoral studies in the East Asian Languages and Cultures Department at the University of Southern California in 2015. Under the direction of Dr. Joshua Goldstein, her dissertation, Representations of Blackness in Sino-African American relations, 1949-1972, examined the representation of Blackness as conceptualized by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and the influence of said representation(s) within Sino-African American relations. Sino-African American exchanges created hybrid spaces where ideals about and demands for social transformation were communicated. Her research primarily used Chinese source materials to explore the tensions and solidarity engendered in these transracial and transnational interactions.  Dr. Brown’s work complicated the current Sino-African American narrative through an analysis of the multiple ways race, as a lens for understanding the other, handicapped the possibility of this alliance to fully materialize via a focus on the representation of Blackness in the Chinese context. Dr. Brown is currently extending her dissertation scholarship to include contemporary China to analyze and compare representations and understandings of Blackness in light of globalization’s spread of Black American culture through popular culture and sports. Additionally, this new scholarship interrogates the ways in which President Barack Obama adds to or complicates understandings of Black Americans in the Chinese context. Dr. Brown’s research interests include 20th century Sino-Black Relations, Race and Ethnicity, Modern Chinese History, Transnationalism, and Cold War politics.

Paper title: “Aubrey Pankey, Performativity of Blackness, and Constructions of Race in Maoist China”


Hye Kyoung Kwon

Hye Kyoung Kwon (hyekyoungkwon11@gmail.com) is a Ph.D candidate in Theater and Performance Studies in the UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television. She completed her B.A and M.A in Sogang University, Seoul, South Korea. She studied contemporary South Korean political theater and feminist theater during her M.A program, and her thesis focused on the ways in which textual anxiety from national censorship and governmental surveillance manifested in South Korean theater of the 1970s. Her recent research interest is how the surface of Korean-ness has been shaped in the context of globalization – including the transnational mobility of South Korean visual media, multi-cultural performances, and Korean/American theaters.

Paper title: “‘Gangnam Beauties’: Freaks or Hybrid Faces?”


So-Rim Lee

So-Rim Lee (sorimlee@stanford.edu) is a doctoral candidate in the department of Theater and Performance Studies. She holds a B.A. in Film Studies from Columbia University, an M.A. in English Literature from Seoul National University, and an M.A. in Text and Performance from Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA). Before coming to Stanford, So-Rim worked as a professional translator and editor with commissions from Seoul Metropolitan Government and Literature Translation Institute of Korea. She wrote her master’s theses on Allen Ginsberg’s performance poetics in Howl and the potentiality of theatrical mise-en-scene in the photographs of Angus McBean and Diane Arbus. So-Rim researches the intersection between Performance Studies and Visual Studies, historiographies of the First Avant-Garde, East Asian Trans-Pacific performances, and transnational translation and adaptation theories.

Paper title: “Towards a Discourse of Beauty: Koreanness and Cosmetic Surgery in Modern South Korea”


Tara Rodman

Tara Rodman (tararodman2014@u.northwestern.edu) is a candidate in the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Theatre and Drama at Northwestern University. Her research has been published in Theatre Journal and Theatre Research International. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Fulbright IIE and the Nippon Foundation. Her dissertation examines transnational modern dance through the career of Itō Michio.

Paper title: “Choreographing the Silk Road: Itō Michio and the 1964 Tokyo Olympics”


Co-convener

Paper title: “Touring Blackness in Korea, 1920-1988”

Soo Ryon Yoon


Co-convener

Paper title: “Playing (with) Others: Theatrical Representations of Racialized Others in South Korea”

Ji Hyon Kayla Yuh


 

2017 Atlanta

Extraordinary Bodies in/and East Asia

Kyungjin Jo is a Ph.D. student in Theatre and Performance at CUNY Graduate Center. She is currently working on her dissertation proposal and interested in looking at US American plays and musicals that feature white American or European characters who travel, live, or work in East Asia during the latter half of the twentieth and the first part of the twenty-first century. She adjuncts at Baruch College, and works as a WAC (Writing Across Curriculum) fellow at LaGuardia Community College.

Kyungjin Jo


Yeong Ran Kim is a PhD candidate in the department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies at Brown University. Her dissertation, tentatively titled The Immanence of politics and aesthetics: Queer Times in Global South Korea, examines the ways in which new modes of being emerge through particular times of protests, film festivals, pride events, and performance-based arts. It considers queer artists and activists material, performative, and affective labor to be the very force that helps queer subjects imagine otherwise. It tracks how queer activism and artmaking create stages for moments of coming together, which enable different socialities and collectivities within and against the matrix of home/queer phobia, heteropatriarchy, nationalism, and neoliberal capitalism. The dissertation thus explores the way in which queerness performs, disrupting the heteronormative time and space encoded within neoliberal progressive paradigms. Queer activism and artmaking set up a stage, which is both temporal and physical, where queer subjects make another world in the world. Yeong Ran received a BA in Anthropology from Seoul National University and an MA in Media Studies from the New School, and an MA in Performance Studies from New York University. As a visual/sonic media composer, she has collaborated with artists based in NYC, presenting multimedia performances including Ecstatic Corona and The Children of Mercy-Files across artistic and academic venues such as the Re/Mixed Media Festival, the Martin E. Segal Theatre Center at the CUNY Graduate Center, Barnard College and Sarah Lawrence College.

Yeong Ran Kim


Hye Kyoung Kwon is a Ph.D candidate in Theater and Performance Studies in the UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television. She completed her B.A and M.A in Sogang University, Seoul, South Korea. She studied contemporary South Korean political theater and feminist theater during her M.A program, and her thesis focused on the ways in which textual anxiety from national censorship and governmental surveillance manifested in South Korean theater of the 1970s. Her recent research interest is how the surfaces of Korean-ness have been shaped in the context of globalization - including the transnational mobility of South Korean visual media, multi-cultural performances, and Korean/American theaters.

Hye-Kyoung Kwon


Jieun Lee is a doctoral candidate at the University of Georgia, pursuing a PhD in Theatre and Performance Studies. She holds an MA in Theatre from Hunter College, the City University of New York, and a Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies from the University of Georgia. She is currently working on her dissertation entitled Performing the Korean Diaspora in Contemporary Theater and Performance Art in the United States of America, and is teaching Feminist Theories at the University of Georgia.

Jieun Lee


Katherine Mezur is a Lecturer in the Department of Comparative Literature, U of California Berkeley and Associate Researcher at the San Francisco Museum of Performance and Design. Her research focuses on Asia Pacific performance. Her monograph (Beautiful Boys/Outlaw Bodies: Female-likeness in Kabuki (Palgrave), is a critical historiography/performance analysis of the onnagata, who perform female gender roles. Her current project, Cute Mutant Girls: Performing Sweet and Deviant in Contemporary Japan expands concepts and practices of kawaii (cute) aesthetics and in popular girl performance in live and mediated/robotic performances. Current projects include, Sensuous Politics: Performing Modernities in East Asia co-edited with Emily Wilcox (2018) and Technology's Bodies: Screens, Animation, and Robots; chapters, "dumbtype's Wonder Women: Corporeal Affect and Medial Precarity," the dumbtype Workbook, eds. Fujii, Eckersall, Performance Research Monograph, 2018, "At Risk: Butoh's Genders," for The Routledge Companion for Butoh, Baird, Candelario, 2017. She co-curated the 2015 PSi 21 Fluid States, Aomori, Tohoku: Beyond Contamination: Corporeality, Spirituality, and Pilgrimage. She is a core member of the Butoh research unit Portfolio Butoh [http://www.portfolio_butoh.jp/] and a choreographer and dramaturge. She leads physical theatre workshops based in practices from noh, kabuki, butoh, view points, and mask/object theatre. She has taught at McGill, Georgetown, University of Washington, Seattle, CAL Arts, and UC Santa Barbara.

Katherine Mezur


Sunghee Pak is a Ph.D. candidate in the Interdisciplinary Theatre Studies at University of Wisconsin-Madison with English as her doctoral minor. Her previous education includes M.A. and B.A. degrees in English (Yonsei University, South Korea). Her current research focuses on modern and contemporary adaptations of Early Modern English drama, including postcolonial and postdramatic Shakespeare.

Sunghee Pak


Nancy Yunhwa Rao is professor of music, Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University. Her recent work highlights the much-neglected musical and theatrical history of Chinese in the United States, Canada, and Cuba. Her research has led to writings on transnational issues in the production and opera performance in Chinatown theaters in cities of North America. Publications in this area can be found in "Racial Essence and Historical Invisibility: Chinese Opera in New York, 1930," Cambridge Opera Journal; "The Public Face of Chinatown: Actresses, Actors, Playwrights, and Audiences of Chinatown Theaters in San Francisco of the 1920s," Journal of the Society for American Music; "Transnationalism and Everyday Practice: Chinatown Theatres of North America in the 1920s," Ethnomusicology Forum; "Cantonese Opera in Turn-of-the Century Canada: Local History and Transnational Circulation," Journal of 19th Century Music Review; as well as several collections of essays. Her book, Chinatown Opera Theater in North America (University Illinois Press, 2017) includes analysis of opera arias, playbills, performing networks, stage spectacles, spectatorship, and more. As a music analyst, Rao has explored intersections between China and the West, in particular global perspectives in contemporary Chinese music. She has published on the use of music gestures, vocal style, and percussion patterns of Beijing opera in contemporary music by composers of Chinese origin. Her study on the American woman composer, Ruth Crawford, won her a national award of best article in American music published in 2007 from the Society for American Music.

Nancy Rao


Tara Rodman is an Assistant Professor of Drama at University California, Irvine. She received her Ph.D. in 2017 from Northwestern University. Her research has appeared in Theatre Journal and Theatre Research International.

Tara Rodman


A PhD candidate in Department of Theatre of The Ohio State University. She received her MA degree from National Taiwan University. After finishing the study of her master degree, she was awarded Fulbright Scholarship and Ohio State University Fellowship to continue her study for her doctoral degree in the United States. Her research interests focus on ancient Greek drama and its modern interpretation, Asian theatre and Performance Studies, and Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Yi-Ping Wu


Co-convener. Soo Ryon Yoon is an assistant professor of performance studies in the Department of Cultural Studies at Lingnan University, Hong Kong. She is currently revising her book manuscript, Choreographing Affinities: Race, Blackness, and Transnational Performance in Korea (working title). Her writings are published or forthcoming in Dancing East Asia (edited volume), Journal of Contemporary Research in Dance (当代舞蹈艺术研究), positions: asia critique, and Theatre Journal. She received her Ph.D. in performance studies from Northwestern University and previously held a postdoctoral associateship in the Council on East Asian Studies, Yale University.

Soo Ryon Yoon


Co-convener. Ji Hyon (Kayla) Yuh is a PhD Candidate in Theatre and Performance Studies Program at CUNY Graduate Center. Her dissertation looks at the global musical theatre within the contexts of South Korean and East Asian political economy, and examines the history and implications of performances of race on musical theatre stage in South Korea and East Asia, using case studies such as Korean productions of Broadway musicals such as Dreamgirls and Hairspray as well as original Korean musicals that feature racial other as central figures in the narrative. She is also a contributing author in the Routledge Handbook of Asian Theatre (edited by Siyuan Liu), Palgrave Handbook of Musical Theatre Producers (edited by Laura MacDonald and William A. Everett), Dancing East Asia (forthcoming, edited by Emily Wilcox and Katherine Mezur), and The Routledge Companion to the American Stage Musical: 1970 and Beyond (forthcoming, edited by Elizabeth Wollman and Jessica Sternfeld).

Ji Hyon Kayla Yuh